Colin Walker

on social media, tech, blogging and the internet.

Adobe Photoshop Express goes truly social.

Photoshop ExpressThe reach of social media is growing ever wider and this is evident in the direction that software and services are taking. The Adobe Photoshop Express beta, for example, has been updated but the only ‘functional’ change advertised is that you can now perform a ‘Save As’ in order to preserve your original image.

No, the real news here is that Adobe are hooking in to the desire to go social. It seems that we are no longer happy with software or services that just do X – we demand more and we are increasingly demanding a social aspect.

The new features announced are as follows:

  • flickr integration: you can now import images directly from flickr, edit them in Photoshop Express and then fire them straight back to flickr
  • embeddable player: rather than just show off your slide show on the Photoshop Express site you can use an embeddable widget to take you slide show with you across the web.

What’s intersting with the widget is the choice of examples given by Adobe where you would like to display your pictures; they could have mentioned anything but instead refer to “Facebook, MySpace, and other sites where your audience awaits”. Adobe are obviously trying to cash in on the social movement. How long before we get a Photoshop Express Freemium option? Once you’re hooked in to editing your images online will we get a version which charges you for key functionality post beta? Only time will tell.

Photoshop Express is an ideal target for a social application but I think we should all be concerned if many other applications try to force a social element upon us where it just doesn’t fit to do so.

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May 19, 2008 - Posted by | Betas, Social Media |

1 Comment »

  1. Adobe is playing catch-up. Their crappy terms of service are still keeping folks away, and they’re trying to get into a market which is already fairly well-established. Flickr integration was a do-or-die maneuver. They might manage to get a bit of market share amongst folks who want to make some basic quick edits, but any serious hobbyist or professional is going to continue to use offline image editing software.

    Comment by Aaron B. Hockley | May 19, 2008 | Reply


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